09 August 2019 In Liver Disease

BACKGROUND: Adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) is thought to reduce liver steatosis.

OBJECTIVES: To explore the associations with liver steatosis of 3 different diets: a MedDiet + extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), MedDiet + nuts, or a control diet.

METHODS: This was a subgroup analysis nested within a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group clinical trial, PREvencion con DIeta MEDiterranea (PREDIMED trial: ISRCTN35739639), aimed at assessing the effect of a MedDiet on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. One hundred men and women (mean age: 64 +/- 6 y), at high cardiovascular risk (62% with type 2 diabetes) from the Bellvitge-PREDIMED center were randomly assigned to a MedDiet supplemented with EVOO, a MedDiet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet (advice to reduce all dietary fat). No recommendations to lose weight or increase physical activity were given. Main measurements were the percentage of liver fat and the diagnosis of steatosis, which were determined by NMR imaging. The association of diet with liver fat content was analyzed by bivariate analysis after a median follow-up of 3 y.

RESULTS: Baseline adiposity and cardiometabolic risk factors were similar among the 3 treatment arms. At 3 y after the intervention hepatic steatosis was present in 3 (8.8%), 12 (33.3%), and 10 (33.3%) of the participants in the MedDiet + EVOO, MedDiet + nuts, and control diet groups, respectively (P = 0.027). Respective mean values of liver fat content were 1.2%, 2.7%, and 4.1% (P = 0.07). A tendency toward significance was observed for the MedDiet + EVOO group compared with the control group. Median values of urinary 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid/creatinine concentrations were significantly (P = 0.001) lower in the MedDiet + EVOO (2.3 ng/mg) than in the MedDiet + nuts (5.0 ng/mg) and control (3.9 ng/mg) groups. No differences in adiposity or glycemic control changes were seen between groups.

CONCLUSIONS: An energy-unrestricted MedDiet supplemented with EVOO, a food with potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is associated with a reduced prevalence of hepatic steatosis in older individuals at high cardiovascular risk.

09 August 2019 In Liver Disease

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Non-alcoholic and alcohol-related fatty liver disease are overlapping diseases in which metabolic syndrome and alcohol consumption each contribute to progressive liver disease. We aimed to assess the effects of alcohol consumption and metabolic syndrome on mortality in individuals with fatty liver. METHODS: We searched the National Health and Nutrition and Examination Survey III for adults (20-74 years old) with hepatic steatosis, detected by ultrasound, for whom mortality and follow-up data were available. We collected data from the alcohol use questionnaire (self-reported number of days a participant drank alcohol; the number of drinks [10 g alcohol] per day on a drinking day; the number of days the participant had 5 or more drinks) and calculated the average amount of alcohol consumption in drinks/day for each participant during the year preceding enrollment. Excessive alcohol consumption for men was >3 drinks/day and for women was >1.5 drinks/day. We also collected clinical data, and mortality data were obtained from the National Death Index. Demographic and clinical parameters were compared among consumption groups using the chi(2) test for independence or survey regression models. We used Cox proportional hazard models to identify independent predictors of all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

RESULTS: The study cohort included 4264 individuals with hepatic steatosis (mean age, 45.9 years; 51% male; 76% white; 46% with metabolic syndrome; 6.2% with excessive alcohol use). There was no significant difference in mean age between individuals with vs without excessive alcohol consumption (P=.65). However, overall mortality was significantly higher among participants with excessive alcohol consumption (32.2%) vs participants with non-excessive alcohol use (22.2%) after mean 20 years of follow up (P=.003), as well as after 5 years of follow up. In multivariate analysis, the presence of metabolic syndrome (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.43; 95% CI, 1.12-1.83) and excessive alcohol consumption (aHR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.21-2.66) were independently associated with an increased risk of death in individuals with hepatic steatosis; any lower average amount of alcohol consumption was not associated with mortality (all P>.60). In a subgroup analysis, the association of excessive alcohol use with mortality was significant in individuals with metabolic syndrome (aHR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.40-4.32) but not without it (P=.74). CONCLUSION: In review of data from the National Health and Nutrition and Examination Survey III, we associated alcohol consumption with increased mortality in participants with fatty liver and metabolic syndrome. These findings indicate an overlap between non-alcoholic and alcohol-related fatty liver disease.

24 June 2019 In Liver Disease

Importance: The prevalence of high-intensity binge drinking (HIBD), defined as consuming 2 or more times the binge threshold defined by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), is rapidly increasing in the United States. While the relationship between alcohol consumption and lipid and liver function enzyme (LFT) biomarkers has been previously examined, the associations of HIBD with those biomarkers remain unknown.

Objective: To examine associations of HIBD with lipid and LFT levels in a cross-sectional sample enriched with participants who engage in HIBD.

Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional study using data from the NIAAA clinical sample collected from March 3, 2005, to August 21, 2017, with participants recruited for either the NIAAA screening protocols or inpatient alcohol treatment program. For this study, participants were stratified by self-reported alcohol consumption into 4 sex-specific binge levels: nonbinge and 1, 2, and 3 or more times the binge threshold (levels I, II, and III). Multivariable analyses examined the odds of clinically high levels of lipids and LFTs across binge levels. Analyses were performed from December 3, 2018, to January 30, 2019.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase. Results: A total of 2065 participants underwent protocol screening; 1519 with data available on alcohol consumption, body mass index, lipid levels, and LFT levels were included in the final analyses. Mean (SD) age was 39.7 (12.1) years; mean (SD) body mass index was 26.6 (5.1); 978 (64.4%) were male; 718 (47.3%) were white; and 578 (31.1%) consumed alcohol at the nonbinge level, 321 (21.2%) at level I, 239 (15.7%) at level II, and 318 (25.1%) at level III. High-intensity binge drinking was associated with 2- to 8-fold increased odds for clinically high levels of HDL-C, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and all LFTs (eg, for HDL-C: level III odds ratio [OR], 8.65; 95% CI, 4.75-15.77 and for gamma-glutamyltransferase: level III OR, 8.21; 95% CI, 5.90-11.43). Increased HIBD frequency (days consuming at levels II and III) was associated with increased odds for clinically high levels of HDL-C, total cholesterol, and all LFTs (per unit increase in days consuming at the respective binge level) (eg, for HDL-C: level II OR, 1.025; 95% CI, 1.014-1.036 and level III OR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.019-1.047 and for gamma-glutamyltransferase: level II OR, 1.028; 95% CI, 1.019-1.037 and level III OR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.019-1.047).

Conclusions and Relevance: High-impact binge drinking was significantly associated with increased odds for clinically high levels of lipids and LFTs. Given that HIBD is increasingly common among US adults, targeted interventions aimed at reducing HIBD may have important health benefits.

22 February 2019 In Liver Disease

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the longitudinal relationship between repeated measures of alcohol consumption and risk of developing fatty liver.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 5407 men and women from a British population-based cohort, the Whitehall II study of civil servants, who self-reported alcohol consumption by questionnaire over approximately 30 years (1985-1989 through to 2012-2013). Drinking typologies during midlife were linked to measures of fatty liver (the fatty liver index, FLI) when participants were in older age (age range 60-84 years) and adjusted for age, socio-economic position, ethnicity, and smoking.

RESULTS: Those who consistently drank heavily had two-fold higher odds of increased FLI compared to stable low-risk moderate drinkers after adjustment for covariates (men: OR = 2.04, 95%CI = 1.53-2.74; women: OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.08-4.55). Former drinkers also had an increased FLI compared to low-risk drinkers (men: OR = 2.09, 95%CI = 1.55-2.85; women: OR = 1.68, 95%CI = 1.08-2.67). There were non-significant differences in FLI between non-drinkers and stable low-risk drinkers. Among women, there was no increased risk for current heavy drinkers in cross sectional analyses.

CONCLUSION: Drinking habits among adults during midlife affect the development of fatty liver, and sustained heavy drinking is associated with an increased FLI compared to stable low-risk drinkers. After the exclusion of former drinkers, there was no difference between non-drinkers and low-risk drinkers, which does not support a protective effect on fatty liver from low-risk drinking. Cross-sectional analyses among women did not find an increased risk of heavy drinking compared to low-risk drinkers, thus highlighting the need to take a longitudinal approach.

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