13 October 2020 In Diabetes
Background Heavy alcohol consumption has a well-established association with hypertension. However, doubt persists whether moderate alcohol consumption has a similar link. This relationship is not well-studied in patients with diabetes mellitus. We aimed to describe the association of alcohol consumption with prevalent hypertension in participants in the ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) trial. Methods and Results Alcohol consumption was categorized as none, light (1-7 drinks/week), moderate (8-14 drinks/week), and heavy (>/=15 drinks/week). Blood pressure was categorized using American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines as normal, elevated blood pressure, stage 1 hypertension, and stage 2 hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association between alcohol consumption and prevalent hypertension. A total of 10 200 eligible participants were analyzed. Light alcohol consumption was not associated with elevated blood pressure or any stage hypertension. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with elevated blood pressure, stage 1, and stage 2 hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 1.79; 95% CI, 1.04-3.11, P=0.03; OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.05-2.60, P=0.03; and OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.03-2.54, P=0.03, respectively). Heavy alcohol consumption was associated with elevated blood pressure, stage 1, and stage 2 hypertension (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.17-3.12, P=0.01; OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.03-6.17, P=0.03; and OR, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.28-7.22, P=0.01, respectively). Conclusions Despite prior research, our findings show moderate alcohol consumption is associated with hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated cardiovascular risk. We also note a dose-risk relationship with the amount of alcohol consumed and the degree of hypertension.
13 October 2020 In Diabetes
It is well known that alcohol consumption is associated with type 2 diabetes. However, the association between age of alcohol onset (AAO) and drinking duration with type 2 diabetes among Chinese adults is not fully understood. Our study was based on the data from the China Kadoorie Biobank, which included 512,712 participants aged 30-79 years in China from 2004-2008. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to estimate the association between AAO and drinking duration with type 2 diabetes. After adjustment for potential covariates, 18.1 = AAO = 29.0, 29.1 = AAO = 39.0 and AAO > 39.0 were associated with 22% (95%CI: 14%, 30%), 25% (95%CI: 17%, 33%) and 32% (95%CI: 24%, 39%) lower hazard ratio of type 2 diabetes, compared with abstainer, respectively. Drinking duration 30.0 were associated with 18% (95%CI: 9%, 33%) and 20% (95%CI: 3%, 40%) higher hazard ratio of type 2 diabetes, compared with 18.1 = AAO = 29.0 and drinking duration
25 August 2020 In Diabetes

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We prospectively assessed the association between a healthy lifestyle score (HLS) and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a Mediterranean cohort.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed up 11,005 participants initially free of diabetes diagnosis in the "Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra" (SUN) cohort. We evaluated the influence of lifestyle-related factors based on a score previously related to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Only one incident case of T2DM was found among those with a baseline BMI 22 kg/m(2). We measured the baseline adherence of a HLS that included: never smoking, physical activity, Mediterranean diet adherence, moderate alcohol consumption, avoidance of binge drinking, low television exposure, taking a short nap, spending time with friends and working hours. Incident cases of T2DM were self-reported by participants and confirmed by a physician. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were fitted to assess the association between HLS and the incidence of T2DM. After a median follow-up of 12 years, 145 incident cases of T2DM were observed. Among participants with a BMI >22 kg/m(2), the highest category of HLS adherence (7-9 points) showed a significant 46% relatively decreased hazard of T2DM compared with the lowest category (0-4 points) (multivariable adjusted HR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.99).

CONCLUSIONS: Higher adherence to a HLS, including some factors not typically studied, may reduce T2DM risk. Preventive efforts should preferentially focus on weight control. However, this score may promote a comprehensive approach to diabetes prevention beyond weight reduction.

25 August 2020 In Diabetes

Health benefits of moderate wine consumption have been studied during the past decades, first in observational studies and more recently, in experimental settings and randomized controlled studies. Suggested biological pathways include antioxidant, lipid regulating, and anti-inflammatory effects. Both the alcoholic and polyphenolic components of wine are believed to contribute to these beneficial effects.

Although several of these studies demonstrated protective associations between moderate drinking and cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension, certain types of cancer, type 2 diabetes, neurological disorders, and the metabolic syndrome, no conclusive recommendations exist regarding moderate wine consumption. Yet, it is suggested that the physician and patient should discuss alcohol use. In the CASCADE (CArdiovaSCulAr Diabetes & Ethanol) trial, 224 abstainers with type 2 diabetes were randomized to consume red wine, white wine or mineral water for two years.

Here, we summarize our previous findings, offer new evidence concerning the differential effects of wine consumption among men and women, and further suggest that initiating moderate alcohol consumption among well-controlled persons with type 2 diabetes is apparently safe, in regard to changes in heart rate variability and carotid plaque formation

Page 6 of 14

Contact us

We love your feedback. Get in touch with us.

  • Tel: +32 (0)2 230 99 70
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.