13 October 2020 In Cardiovascular System
Although, three decades have pasted from the introduction of "French Paradox", is still an issue for debate. Epidemiology supports the J-shaped relationship between wine consumption and vascular events as well as cardiovascular mortality with a maximum protection at 21 g of alcohol consumption in the form of wine per day. Nevertheless, the aforementioned studies have used an observational design that raises concerns about potential confounding. Randomized clinical studies may provide data to end the controversy and in parallel with in vitro experiments to elucidate the mechanisms by which wine affects cardiovascular disease. In this concept, this review aims to address the presence of bioactive wine micro constituents, their potential mechanisms of action and also to summarize the cardio-protective effects of wine intake based on clinical trials. The role of wine micro-constituents in inflammation and haemostasis is discussed in detail.
13 October 2020 In Cardiovascular System
Existing data have described benefits and drawbacks of alcohol consumption on cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but no research has evaluated its association with the cardiovascular health (CVH) score proposed by the American Heart Association. Here, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis on the Kardiovize cohort (Brno, Czech Republic), to investigate the relationship between alcohol consumption and CVH. We included 1773 subjects (aged 25-64 years; 44.2% men) with no history of CVD. We compared CVD risk factors, CVH metrics (i.e., BMI, healthy diet, physical activity level, smoking status, blood pressure, fasting glucose, and total cholesterol) and CVH score between and within several drinking categories. We found that the relationship between drinking habits and CVH was related to the amount of alcohol consumed, drinking patterns, and beverage choices. Heavy drinkers were more likely to smoke tobacco, and to report diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol at higher level than non-drinkers. Among drinkers, however, people who exclusively drank wine exhibited better CVH than those who exclusively drank beer. Although our findings supported the hypothesis that drinking alcohol was related to the CVH in general, further prospective research is needed to understand whether the assessment of CVH should incorporate information on alcohol consumption.
13 October 2020 In Cardiovascular System
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Managing alcohol consumption may be an effective way of preventing hypertension, which is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, there is little evidence on the temporal relationship between alcohol consumption and incidence of hypertension. We investigated the prospective association between repeated measures of alcohol consumption and hypertension incidence among Korean adults aged 40 and over. METHODS: This study included a total of 4989 participants that were not taking antihypertensive drugs and had normal blood pressure (BP) (systolic /=30 ml/d of alcohol was associated with a risk of hypertension among men (IRR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.20-2.48, p trend = 0.017 for baseline alcohol consumption; IRR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.23-2.33, p trend = 0.005 for the most recent alcohol consumption; IRR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.09-2.03, p trend = 0.014 for average alcohol consumption). After additional adjustment for baseline BP the positive association remained only when the most recent alcohol consumption measure was used. There was no significant association between alcohol consumption and hypertension among women, and no interaction effect between alcohol consumption and baseline BP levels on incidence of hypertension (all p interaction > 0.05) existed. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption, especially consuming >/=30 ml/d, may be positively linked with incidence risk of hypertension among men.
13 October 2020 In Cardiovascular System
BACKGROUND: Observational studies have documented lower risks of coronary heart disease and diabetes among moderate alcohol consumers relative to abstainers, but only a randomized clinical trial can provide conclusive evidence for or against these associations. AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the rationale and design of the Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health Trial, aimed to assess the cardiometabolic effects of one alcoholic drink daily over an average of six years among adults 50 years or older. METHODS: This multicenter, parallel-arm randomized trial was designed to compare the effects of one standard serving ( approximately 11-15 g) daily of a preferred alcoholic beverage to abstention. The trial aimed to enroll 7800 people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. The primary composite endpoint comprised time to the first occurrence of non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal ischemic stroke, hospitalized angina, coronary/carotid revascularization, or total mortality. The trial was designed to provide >80% power to detect a 15% reduction in the risk of the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included diabetes. Adverse effects of special interest included injuries, congestive heart failure, alcohol use disorders, and cancer. RESULTS: We describe the design, governance, masking issues, and data handling. In three months of field center activity until termination by the funder, the trial randomized 32 participants, successfully screened another 70, and identified approximately 400 additional interested individuals. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a feasible design for a long-term randomized trial of moderate alcohol consumption. Such a study will provide the highest level of evidence for the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and will directly inform clinical and public health guidelines.
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