23 February 2021 In Cancer
Alcohol consumption is correlated positively with risk for breast cancer in observational studies, but observational studies are subject to reverse causation and confounding. The association with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unclear. We performed both observational Cox regression and two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses using data from various European cohort studies (observational) and publicly available cancer consortia (MR). These estimates were compared to World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) findings. In our observational analyses, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for a one standard drink/day increase was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI]; 1.04, 1.08) for breast cancer and 1.00 (0.92, 1.08) for EOC, both of which were consistent with previous WCRF findings. MR ORs per genetically predicted one standard drink/day increase estimated via 34 SNPs using MR-PRESSO were 1.00 (0.93, 1.08) for breast cancer and 0.95 (0.85, 1.06) for EOC. Stratification by EOC subtype or estrogen receptor status in breast cancers made no meaningful difference to the results. For breast cancer, the CIs for the genetically derived estimates include the point-estimate from observational studies so are not inconsistent with a small increase in risk. Our data provide additional evidence that alcohol intake is unlikely to have anything other than a very small effect on risk of EOC.
23 November 2020 In Cancer

Alcohol is widely consumed and is known as a major risk factor for several types of cancers. Yet, it is unclear whether alcohol consumption is associated with the risk of prostate cancer (PCa) or not. We conducted linear and non-linear dose-response meta-analyses of cohort studies on alcohol consumption and PCa risk by types of alcohol (total, wine, beer, and liquor) and PCa (non-aggressive and aggressive). Pubmed and Embase were searched through April 2020 to identify relevant studies.

Summary relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using a random-effects model. For non-aggressive PCa, by alcohol type, the risk increased linearly with liquor (RR per 14 g/day intake (alcohol content in standard drink) being 1.04 (95% CI = 1.02-1.06, I(2) = 0%, three studies) and non-linearly with beer (Pnon-linearity = 0.045, four studies), with increased risk observed in the lower range (RR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.01-1.05; 14 g/day), with 1.05 (95% CI = 1.01-1.08) at 28 g/day. Wine was not significantly associated with the risk of non-aggressive PCa. For aggressive PCa, a non-linear relationship of diverse shapes was indicated for all types of alcohol in the sensitivity analysis.

Compared to non-drinking, a significant positive association was more apparent at lower dose for liquor (RR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.04-1.20 at 14 g/day; RR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.03-1.31 at 28 g/day; Pnon-linearity = 0.005, three studies) but at higher doses for wine (RR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.90-1.16 at 28 g/day, RR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.08-1.67 at 56 g/day; Pnon-linearity = 0.01, four studies). In contrast, decreased risks were indicated at lower doses of beer (RR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.79-0.92 at 14 g/day; RR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.70-0.90 at 28 g/day, Pnon-linearity < 0.001, four studies).

Total alcohol consumption was not associated with both types of PCa. In this study, we found heterogeneous associations between alcohol intake and PCa by types of alcohol and PCa.

23 November 2020 In Cancer

BACKGROUND: Smoking is a well-established cause of lung cancer and there is strong evidence that smoking also increases the risk of several other cancers. Alcohol consumption has been inconsistently associated with cancer risk in observational studies. This mendelian randomisation (MR) study sought to investigate associations in support of a causal relationship between smoking and alcohol consumption and 19 site-specific cancers.

METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used summary-level data for genetic variants associated with smoking initiation (ever smoked regularly) and alcohol consumption, and the corresponding associations with lung, breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer from genome-wide association studies consortia, including participants of European ancestry. We additionally estimated genetic associations with 19 site-specific cancers among 367,643 individuals of European descent in UK Biobank who were 37 to 73 years of age when recruited from 2006 to 2010. Associations were considered statistically significant at a Bonferroni corrected p-value below 0.0013. Genetic predisposition to smoking initiation was associated with statistically significant higher odds of lung cancer in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (odds ratio [OR] 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-2.03; p = 2.26 x 10-21) and UK Biobank (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.92-2.65; p = 1.17 x 10-22). Additionally, genetic predisposition to smoking was associated with statistically significant higher odds of cancer of the oesophagus (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.34-2.49; p = 1.31 x 10-4), cervix (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.27-1.88; p = 1.24 x 10-5), and bladder (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.92-2.65; p = 9.40 x 10-5) and with statistically nonsignificant higher odds of head and neck (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.13-1.74; p = 0.002) and stomach cancer (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.05-2.03; p = 0.024). In contrast, there was an inverse association between genetic predisposition to smoking and prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome consortium (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.83-0.98; p = 0.011) and in UK Biobank (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.80-1.02; p = 0.104), but the associations did not reach statistical significance. We found no statistically significant association between genetically predicted alcohol consumption and overall cancer (n = 75,037 cases; OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.84-1.07; p = 0.376). Genetically predicted alcohol consumption was statistically significantly associated with lung cancer in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.41-2.68; p = 4.68 x 10-5) but not in UK Biobank (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.65-1.93; p = 0.686). There was no statistically significant association between alcohol consumption and any other site-specific cancer. The main limitation of this study is that precision was low in some analyses, particularly for analyses of alcohol consumption and site-specific cancers.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the well-established relationship between smoking and lung cancer and suggest that smoking may also be a risk factor for cancer of the head and neck, oesophagus, stomach, cervix, and bladder. We found no evidence supporting a relationship between alcohol consumption and overall or site-specific cancer risk.

23 November 2020 In Cancer

No abstract available.

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