06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

BACKGROUND: Both alcohol consumption and obesity have been linked with breast cancer morbidity and mortality. An inverse association between alcohol intake and obesity suggests possible confounding between these variables (and perhaps other factors) with breast cancer outcomes.

METHODS: Alcohol intake (beer, wine, spirits, and total) was examined in 3,088 women previously diagnosed and treated for breast cancer within an intervention trial that targeted vegetables, fiber, and fat but not alcohol or weight loss. Factors associated with baseline alcohol intake were included in Cox proportional hazards models for recurrence and mortality.

RESULTS: Alcohol intake was significantly associated with higher education and physical activity levels. Neither light alcohol intake nor obesity was significantly associated with breast cancer recurrence, but moderate alcohol intake >300 g/mo was protective against all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence intervals, 0.49-0.97) in a proportional hazards model adjusted for obesity. Obese women were 61% more likely to be nondrinkers than drinkers, and 76% more likely to be light drinkers than moderate/heavy drinkers. In nonobese women, alcohol intake >10 g/mo was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence intervals, 0.51-0.91).

CONCLUSION: Light alcohol intake, regardless of body weight, did not increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence or all-cause mortality in this cohort of middle-aged women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Alcohol intake was associated with other favorable prognostic indicators, which may explain its apparent protective effect in nonobese women.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

PURPOSE: Alcohol intake may adversely affect the concentrations of endogenous sex hormones, and thus increase the risk of endometrial cancer. However, epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting results. Therefore, we investigated the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk a large, multicenter, prospective study.

METHODS: From 1992 through 2010, 301,051 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort were followed for incident endometrial cancer (n = 1382). Baseline alcohol consumption was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Information on past alcohol consumption was collected by lifestyle questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models.

RESULTS: The multivariable HRs (and 95% CIs) compared with light drinkers (0.1-6 g/d) were 1.03 (0.88-1.20) for 0 g of alcohol per day at baseline, 1.01 (0.86-1.17) for 6.1-12 g/d, 1.03 (0.87-1.22) for 12.1-24 g/d, 1.07 (0.87-1.38) for 24.1-36 g/d, and 0.85 (0.61-1.18) for more than 36 g/d (p(trend) = 0.77). No association was observed among former drinkers (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.98-1.68 compared with light drinkers). Null associations were also found between alcohol consumption at age 20 years, lifetime pattern of alcohol drinking, and baseline alcohol intake from specific alcoholic beverages and endometrial cancer risk.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest no association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

Studies have indicated hazardous consumption of large quantities of alcohol among adults in Lithuania. We assessed the associations of alcohol consumption at baseline with cancer incidence among men in a population-based cohort study, using Cox models adjusted for smoking, education and body mass index. Attained age was used as a time-scale. During follow-up (1978-2008) 1,698 men developed cancer. A higher amount of alcohol consumption (>/=140.1 g/week vs. 0.1-10.0 g/week) was positively associated with increased risk of total cancer [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 1.11, 1.65], upper aerodigestive tract cancer (HR = 2.79, 95 % CI 1.23, 6.34) and alcohol-related cancers (i.e. oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, colorectal and liver cancer) (HR = 1.88, 95 % CI 1.25, 2.85). Compared to occasional drinkers (a few times/year), drinkers 2-7 times/week showed an increased risk of total (HR = 1.45, 95 % CI 1.16, 1.83), alcohol-related (HR = 1.83 95 % CI 1.14, 2.93) and other cancers (HR = 1.35, 95 % CI 1.04, 1.76). Our results showed no statistically significant associations between quantity of alcohol intake per one occasion and risk of cancer. About 13 % of total, 35 % of upper aerodigestive tract, 22 % of alcohol-related and 10 % of other cancer cases were due to alcohol consumption in this cohort of men.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

BACKGROUND: Alcohol increases breast cancer risk. Epidemiological studies suggest folate may modify this relationship.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship among breast cancer, alcohol and folate in the Women's Health Initiative-Observational Study (WHI-OS).

METHODS: 88,530 postmenopausal women 50-79 years completed baseline questionnaires between October 1993 and December 1998, which addressed alcohol and folate intake and breast cancer risk factors. Cox proportional hazards analysis examined the relationship between self-reported baseline alcohol and folate intake and incident breast cancer.

RESULTS: 1,783 breast cancer cases occurred over 5 years. Alcohol was associated with increased risk of breast cancer (RR = 1.005, 95%CI 1.001-1.009). Risk increased with consumption of alcohol (up to 5 g/d, adjusted HR = 1.10, 95%CI 0.96-1.32; >5-15 g/d HR = 1.14, 95%CI 0.99-1.31; and >15 g/d HR = 1.13 95%CI 0.96-1.32). We found no significant interaction between alcohol and folate in our adjusted model.

CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for folate attenuating alcohol's effect on breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. Our results may be due to misclassification of folate intake or the relatively short follow-up period.

 

 

 

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