06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

The role of alcoholic beverages in bladder carcinogenesis is still unclear, with conflicting evidence from different studies. We investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and bladder cancer, and the potential interaction between alcohol consumption and other exposures. In a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County, 1,586 pairs of cases and their matched neighborhood controls were interviewed. Data were analyzed to determine whether bladder cancer risk differs by alcohol consumption, and whether different alcoholic beverages have different effects. The risk of bladder cancer decreased with increasing frequency (p for trend = 0.003) and duration of alcohol consumption (p for trend = 0.017). Subjects who drank more than 4 drinks per day had a 32% lower (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.90) risk of bladder cancer than those who never drank any alcoholic beverage. Beer (p for trend = 0.002) and wine (p for trend = 0.054) consumption were associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer, while hard liquor was not. The reduction in risk was mostly seen among shorter-term smokers who urinated frequently. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. The effect was modified by the type of alcoholic beverage, cigarette smoking and frequency of urination.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

BACKGROUND: In the Bagnardi et al. (2001) meta-analysis, it was found that alcohol consumption increases the risk of stomach cancer (OR = 1.32 for heavy drinkers). However, it is unknown if drinking cessation reverses this alcohol-elevated risk. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed to provide the information for a meta-analysis where the dose-risk trend was estimated for years since drinking cessation and the risk of stomach cancer. A random effect generalised least squares model for trend estimation was used, employing study characteristics to control for heterogeneity. RESULTS: Nineteen observational studies were identified in the literature review, of which five studies quantified duration of cessation and risk of stomach cancer, giving a total of 1947 cancer cases. No significant effect of drinking cessation on the risk of stomach cancer could be found (OR = 0.99 CI: 0.97-1.02). CONCLUSIONS: This result should be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of studies in this area. Recent findings suggest a link between heavy drinking and stomach cancer, especially gastric noncardia, but not for moderate drinking. Since all but one of the included studies in this meta-analysis failed to control for consumption level, the current study could not test if the risk decline following drinking cessation differs between moderate and high consumers.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

BACKGROUND: Increased exposure to endogenous estrogen and/or insulin may partly explain the relationship of obesity, physical inactivity, and alcohol consumption and postmenopausal breast cancer. However, these potential mediating effects have not been formally quantified in a survival analysis setting. METHODS: We combined data from two case-cohort studies based in the Women's Health Initiative-Observational Study with serum estradiol levels, one of which also had insulin levels. A total of 1,601 women (601 cases) aged 50 to 79 years who were not using hormone therapy at enrollment were included. Mediating effects were estimated by applying a new method based on the additive hazard model. RESULTS: A five-unit increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with 50.0 [95% confidence interval (CI), 23.2-76.6] extra cases per 100,000 women at-risk per year. Of these, 23.8% (95% CI, 2.9-68.4) could be attributed to estradiol and 65.8% (95% CI, 13.6-273.3) through insulin pathways. The mediating effect of estradiol was greater (48.8%; 95% CI, 18.8-161.1) for BMI when restricted to estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) cases. Consuming 7+ drinks/wk compared with abstinence was associated with 164.9 (95% CI, 45.8-284.9) breast cancer cases per 100,000, but no significant contribution from estradiol was found. The effect of alcohol on breast cancer was restricted to ER(+) breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: The relation of BMI with breast cancer was partly mediated through estradiol and, to a greater extent, through insulin. Impact: The findings provide support for evaluation of interventions to lower insulin and estrogen levels in overweight and obese postmenopausal women to reduce breast cancer risk.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(7); 1203-12. (c)2012 AACR

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality and is considered to be largely attributable to inappropriate lifestyle and behavior patterns. The purpose of this review was to undertake a comparison of the strength of the associations between known and putative risk factors for colorectal cancer by conducting 10 independent meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies. Studies published between 1966 and January 2008 were identified through EMBASE and MEDLINE, using a combined text word and MESH heading search strategy. Studies were eligible if they reported estimates of the relative risk for colorectal cancer with any of the following: alcohol, smoking, diabetes, physical activity, meat, fish, poultry, fruits and vegetables. Studies were excluded if the estimates were not adjusted at least for age. Overall, data from 103 cohort studies were included. The risk of colorectal cancer was significantly associated with alcohol: individuals consuming the most alcohol had 60% greater risk of colorectal cancer compared with non- or light drinkers (relative risk 1.56, 95% CI 1.42-1.70). Smoking, diabetes, obesity and high meat intakes were each associated with a significant 20% increased risk of colorectal cancer (compared with individuals in the lowest categories for each) with little evidence of between-study heterogeneity or publication bias. Physical activity was protective against colorectal cancer. Public-health strategies that promote modest alcohol consumption, smoking cessation, weight loss, increased physical activity and moderate consumption of red and processed meat are likely to have significant benefits at the population level for reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer.

 

 

 

Page 283 of 291

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.