27 January 2016 In General Health

BACKGROUND: Physical functioning (PF) is an essential domain of older persons' health and quality of life. Health behaviors are the main modifiable determinants of PF. Cross-sectionally, alcohol consumption appears to be linked to better PF, but longitudinal evidence is mixed and very little is known about alcohol consumption and longitudinal PF trajectories.

METHODS: We conducted longitudinal analyses of 28,783 men and women aged 45-69 years from Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland), and seven towns of the Czech Republic. At baseline, alcohol consumption was measured by a graduated frequency questionnaire and problem drinking was evaluated using the CAGE questionnaire. PF was assessed using the Physical Functioning Subscale of the SF-36 instrument at baseline and three subsequent occasions. Growth curve modeling was used to estimate the associations between alcohol consumption and PF trajectories over 10-year follow-up.

RESULTS: PF scores declined during follow-up in all three cohorts. Faster decline in PF over time was found in Russian female frequent drinkers, Polish female moderate drinkers, and Polish male regular heavy drinkers, in comparison with regular and/or light-to-moderate drinkers. Nondrinking was associated with a faster decline compared with light drinking only in Russian men. Problem drinking and past drinking were not related to the decline rate of PF.

CONCLUSIONS: This large longitudinal study in Central and Eastern European populations with relatively high alcohol intake does not strongly support the existence of a protective effect of alcohol on PF trajectories; if anything, it suggests that alcohol consumption is associated with greater deterioration in PF over time.

23 January 2015 In General Health

Background: Alcohol is increasingly implicated in the mortality crisis observed in Russia since the collapse of the communist system.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the consumption of different beverage types and alcoholism mortality rates in Russia.

Method: Age-standardized male and female alcoholism mortality data for the period 1970-2005 and data on beverage-specific alcohol sales were obtained from Russian State Statistical Committee. Time-series analytical modeling techniques (ARIMA) were used to examine the relation between the sales of different alcoholic beverages (vodka, wine, beer) and alcoholism mortality rates.

30 October 2014 In Cardiovascular System

Stroke is an international health problem with high associated human and economic costs. The mortality rate from stroke in Russia is one of the highest in the world. Risk factors identification is therefore a high priority from the public health perspective. Epidemiological evidence suggests that binge drinking is an important determinant of high stroke mortality rate in Russia. The aim of the present study was to estimate the premature stroke mortality attributable to alcohol abuse in Russia on the basis of aggregate-level data of stroke mortality and alcohol consumption. Age-standardized sex-specific male and female stroke mortality data for the period 1980-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA time series analysis. The results of the analysis suggest that 26.8% of all male stroke deaths and 18.4% female stroke deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. The estimated alcohol-attributable fraction for men ranged from 16.2% (75+ age group) to 57,5% (30-44 agegroup) and for women from 21.7% (60-74 age group) and 43.5% (30- 44 age group). The outcomes of this study provide support for the hypothesis that alcohol is an important contributor to the high stroke mortality rate in Russian Federation. Therefore prevention of alcohol attributable harm should be a major public health priority in Russia. Given the distribution of alcohol-related stroke deaths, interventions should be focused on the young and middle-aged men and women.

28 October 2014 In Latest Scientific News

The findings of a Russian study showed that due to excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages, more than a quarter of Russian males and 18.4% of females die prematurely from stroke.

The mortality rate from stroke in Russia is one of the highest in the world. Epidemiological evidence suggests that binge drinking is an important determinant of this high stroke rate. A study was carried out to estimate the premature stroke mortality attributable to alcohol abuse in Russia on the basis of stroke mortality data and alcohol consumption for the period 1980-2005. The results suggest that 26.8% of all male stroke deaths and 18.4% female stroke deaths could be attributed to alcohol. The estimated alcohol-attributable fraction for men ranged from 16.2% (75+ age group) to 57,5% (30-44 age group) and for women from 21.7% (60-74 age group) and 43.5% (30-44 age group). 

Razvodovsky Y. E., Fraction of stroke mortality attributable to alcohol consumption in Russia. Adicciones. 2014;26(2):126-133.

For more information about this article, read the scientific abstract here.

 

 

 

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