06 May 2014 In Cancer
Obesity, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and postmenopausal hormone use are known modifiable risk factors for breast cancer. We aim to measure incidence rates of breast cancer for women with favorable levels on all 4 risk factors (BMI
06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol consumption is a well-established risk factor for liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous studies have found that increased alcohol consumption can lead to lower absorption of folate. Conversely, higher folate intake has been inversely associated with liver damage and HCC. In the current study, we investigate the effect of alcohol consumption and folate intake on HCC incidence and liver disease mortality in the NIH-American Association of Retired Persons Diet and Health Study.

METHODS: The study population included 494,743 participants who reported at baseline their dietary intake for the previous year. Alcohol and folate were analyzed with hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, smoking, body mass index, and diabetes. HCC incidence (n = 435) was determined through 2006 via linkage with cancer registries, and liver disease mortality (n = 789) was determined through 2008 via linkage to the U.S. Social Security Administration Death Master File and the National Death Index Plus by the National Center for Health Statistics.

RESULTS: Consumption of more than three drinks per day was positively associated with both HCC incidence (HR: 1.92; 95%CI: 1.42-2.60) and liver disease mortality (HR: 5.84; 95%CI: 4.81-7.10), whereas folate intake was associated with neither outcome. Folate, however, modified the relationship between alcohol and HCC incidence (Pinteraction = 0.03), but had no effect on the relationship between alcohol and liver disease mortality (Pinteraction = 0.54).

CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that higher folate intake may ameliorate the effect of alcohol consumption on the development of HCC. Impact: Folate intake may be beneficial in the prevention of alcohol-associated HCC.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

The epidemiologic evidence for the role of alcohol use in pancreatic cancer development is equivocal. The authors prospectively examined the relation between alcohol use and risk of pancreatic cancer among 470,681 participants who were aged 50-71 years in 1995-1996 in the US National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. The authors identified 1,149 eligible exocrine pancreatic cancer cases through December 2003. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals with the referent group being light drinkers (or=3 drinks/day, approximately 40 g of alcohol/day) and 1.62 (95% CI: 1.24, 2.10; P(trend) = 0.001) for heavy liquor use, compared with the respective referent group. The increased risk with heavy total alcohol use was seen in never smokers (relative risk = 1.35, 95% CI: 0.79, 2.30) and participants who quit smoking 10 or more years ago before baseline (relative risk = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.00). These findings suggest a moderately increased pancreatic cancer risk with heavy alcohol use, particularly liquor; however, residual confounding by cigarette smoking cannot be completely excluded.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

The objective of the paper was to summarize the literature findings on alcohol consumption with regard to risk of various gynecological cancers. A Medline search was performed considering available cohort and case-control studies published until 31st March 2009 examining the association between the consumption of alcoholic beverages and cancers of the cervix uteri, corpus uteri, endometrium, ovaries, vagina, and vulva. The number of prospective population-based studies with adequate information on confounding factors is low, particularly for cancers of the cervix, corpus uteri, vulva and vagina. Several register studies have found a higher risk of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal cancers among alcoholics than in the general population. However, these findings have not been confirmed in population-based studies in which confounding factors have been adjusted for. Endometrial, corpus uteri, and ovarian cancers do not seem to be related to alcohol consumption. Analyses regarding the dose-response relationship, source of alcohol (wine, beer, spirits) and interaction with other risk factors have not revealed any further associations. In conclusion, the current body of evidence, which is inadequate for several sites, suggests no association between alcohol consumption and risk of gynecological cancers.

 

 

 

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