23 January 2015 In Cancer

BACKGROUND: Previous epidemiologic studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk. Most of the studies, however, assessed alcohol intake after cancer diagnosis, or measured alcohol intake at baseline only.

METHODS: We prospectively examined the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study with 68 067 female participants aged 34-59 years in 1980. Alcohol intake was measured several times with validated dietary questionnaires. We calculated cumulative average alcohol intake to represent long-term intakes of individual subjects. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for endometrial cancer risk after controlling for several risk factors simultaneously.

RESULTS: We identified a total of 794 invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma from 1980 to 2010. We found an inverse association among alcohol drinkers (multivariable RR=0.81; 95% CI: 0.68-0.96) compared with nondrinkers. Women with light alcohol intake of /= 30 g (>/= 2 drinks) versus 0 g per day were 0.88, 0.83, and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.49-1.25), respectively. The lower risk among drinkers ( approximately half drink per day) appeared to be stronger for obese women, but no significant interaction by body mass index was found.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides prospective evidence for an inverse association between light alcohol intake ( approximately half drink per day) in the long term and endometrial cancer risk, but above that level no significant association was found.

04 December 2014 In Cancer

BACKGROUND: Previous epidemiologic studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk. Most of the studies, however, assessed alcohol intake after cancer diagnosis, or measured alcohol intake at baseline only.

METHODS: We prospectively examined the association between alcohol intake and endometrial cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study with 68 067 female participants aged 34-59 years in 1980. Alcohol intake was measured several times with validated dietary questionnaires. We calculated cumulative average alcohol intake to represent long-term intakes of individual subjects. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for endometrial cancer risk after controlling for several risk factors simultaneously.

RESULTS: We identified a total of 794 invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma from 1980 to 2010. We found an inverse association among alcohol drinkers (multivariable RR=0.81; 95% CI: 0.68-0.96) compared with nondrinkers. Women with light alcohol intake of /= 30 g (>/= 2 drinks) versus 0 g per day were 0.88, 0.83, and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.49-1.25), respectively. The lower risk among drinkers ( approximately half drink per day) appeared to be stronger for obese women, but no significant interaction by body mass index was found.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides prospective evidence for an inverse association between light alcohol intake ( approximately half drink per day) in the long term and endometrial cancer risk, but above that level no significant association was found.

04 December 2014 In Cardiovascular System

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hypertension and alcohol drinking on stroke incidence and whether alcohol drinking would increase the risk of stroke in hypertension participants among Inner Mongolians.

METHODS: A prospective cohort study from June 2003 to July 2012 was conducted among 2535 people aged 20 years and older from Inner Mongolia, China. We categorized the participants into four subgroups according to blood pressure and drinking status. The cumulative risks of stroke among the four subgroups were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared by log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to evaluate the association between hypertension, alcohol drinking and stroke incidence.

RESULTS: A total of 120 stroke patients were observed during the follow-up period. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidential intervals) of stroke for nonhypertension/drinkers, hypertension/nondrinkers and hypertension/drinkers were 1.03 (0.48-2.22), 2.64 (1.45-4.81) and 2.89 (1.55-5.39), respectively, compared with nonhypertension/nondrinkers. The area under ROC curve (AUC) for a model containing hypertension and drinking status along with conventional factors (AUC = 0.684) was significantly (P = 0.005) larger than one containing only conventional factors (AUC = 0.660).

CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that hypertension is an independent risk factor of stroke in Inner Mongolians. Drinkers with hypertension seem to be more susceptible to stroke; larger-sample prospective cohort studies are still required to examine the cumulative effect of drinking and hypertension on stroke incidence.

04 December 2014 In Cardiovascular System

BACKGROUND: Although binge drinking and high resting heart rate independently affect cardiovascular and all-cause mortality risk, the combined effect of these two risk factors and their interaction has rarely been studied. This study examined the association between binge drinking and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and evaluated the potential modifying effect on this association of resting heart rate in Korean men.

METHODS: Men aged 55 years or older in 1985 (n = 2600) were followed for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality for 20.8 years, until 2005. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality by binge drinking and resting heart rate using the Cox proportional hazard model.

RESULTS: Heavy binge drinkers (>/=12 drinks on one occasion) with elevated resting heart rate (>/=80 bpm) had a HR of 2.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.47-3.45) for death from cardiovascular disease and 1.37 (95% CI, 0.87-2.14) for all-cause mortality compared to the reference group (non-drinking and resting heart rate 61-79 bpm). The HRs of dying from cardiovascular disease increased linearly from 1.36 to 1.52, 1.71, and 2.25 among individuals with resting heart rate greater than or equal to 80 bpm within the four alcohol consumption categories (non-drinking, non-binge, moderate binge, and heavy binge), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, among older Korean men, heavy binge drinkers with an elevated resting heart rate are at high risk for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

Page 6 of 18

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.