06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

Within the Netherlands Cohort Study (1986), we examined associations between alcohol consumption, the alcohol dehydrogenase 1C (ADH1C) genotype, and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). After a follow-up period of 7.3 years, 594 CRC cases with information on genotype and baseline alcohol intake were available for analyses. Adjusted incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. In subjects who reported to have consumed equal amounts of total alcohol both 5 years before baseline and at baseline, drinkers of >/=30g of alcohol per day with the ADH1C*2/*2 genotype were associated-although not statistically significant-with an increased risk of CRC relative to abstainers with the ADH1C*1/*1 genotype (RR: 1.91, 95% CI: 0.68, 5.34). The risk estimate in this exposure group increased slightly when compared with light drinkers of >/=0.5-<5g/day with the ADH1C*1/*1 genotype (RR: 2.32, 95% CI: 0.80, 6.72). The interaction term however, was not statistically significant (P>.05). In subjects who reported to have consumed equal amounts of total alcohol both 5 years before baseline and at baseline, drinkers of >/=30g of alcohol per day were associated-although not statistically significant-with an increased risk of CRC relative to abstainers (RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 0.80, 2.38). This risk estimate for high-level drinkers became stronger when compared with light drinkers (RR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.99). As main effect of genotype, we observed that the ADH1C*2/*2 genotype was associated with a 42% increase in risk of CRC when compared with the ADH1C*1/*1 genotype. In conclusion, both genotype and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased risk of CRC. Owing to limited statistical power, we found no apparent evidence for the ADH1C genotype as effect modifier of the relationship between alcohol intake and CRC. Nevertheless, the interaction deserves further investigation in larger genetic epidemiologic studies.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer
BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence for an association between the pattern of lifetime alcohol use and cause-specific risk of death. METHODS: Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated for different causes of death according to patterns of lifetime alcohol consumption using a competing risks approach: 111 953 men and 268 442 women from eight countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study were included. Self-reported alcohol consumption at ages 20, 30, 40 or 50 years and at enrollment were used for the analysis; 26 411 deaths were observed during an average of 12.6 years of follow-up. RESULTS: The association between lifetime alcohol use and death from cardiovascular diseases was different from the association seen for alcohol-related cancers, digestive, respiratory, external and other causes. Heavy users (>5 drinks/day for men and >2.5 drinks/day for women), regardless of time of cessation, had a 2- to 5-times higher risk of dying due to alcohol-related cancers, compared with subjects with lifetime light use (
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