27 July 2018 In General Health

The association between alcohol consumption and hip fracture differed by gender: Men aged 30-59 years drinking frequently or 14+ gl/week had higher risk than moderate drinkers. No significant association was seen in older men. Women not drinking alcohol had higher risk than those drinking moderately both regarding frequency and amount.

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to examine alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture according to age and gender in the population-based Cohort of Norway (1994-2003).

METHODS: Socio-demographics, lifestyle, and health were self-reported and weight and height were measured in 70,568 men and 71,357 women >/= 30 years. Information on subsequent hip fractures was retrieved from hospitals' electronic patient registries during 1994-2013. Frequency of alcohol consumption was categorized: never/seldom, moderate (/= 4 times/week), and amount as number of glasses per week: 0, 1-6, 7-13, 14-27, and 28+. Type of alcohol (wine vs. beer/hard liquor) was also examined. Cox's proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) stratified on gender and baseline age < 60 and >/= 60 years.

RESULTS: During median 15-year follow-up, 1558 men and 2511 women suffered a hip fracture. Using moderate drinkers as reference, men < 60 years drinking frequently had multivariable adjusted HR = 1.73 (CI 1.02-2.96) for hip fracture and more than 2.5 times higher risk if they consumed 14+ glasses compared to 1-6 glasses per week. In other groups of age and gender, no statistically significant increased risk was found in those consuming the highest levels of alcohol. Compared to women with moderate or frequent alcohol use, never/seldom-drinking women had the highest fracture risk. In women, use of wine was associated with lower fracture risk than other types of alcohol.

CONCLUSIONS: Risk of hip fracture was highest in men < 60 years with the highest frequency and amount of alcohol consumption and in non-drinking women.

27 January 2016 In Cardiovascular System

Mendelian randomisation studies from Asia suggest detrimental influences of alcohol on cardiovascular risk factors, but such associations are observed mainly in men. The absence of associations of genetic variants (e.g. rs671 in ALDH2) with such risk factors in women - who drank little in these populations - provides evidence that the observations are not due to genetic pleiotropy. Here, we present a Mendelian randomisation study in a South Korean population (3,365 men and 3,787 women) that 1) provides robust evidence that alcohol consumption adversely affects several cardiovascular disease risk factors, including blood pressure, waist to hip ratio, fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels. Alcohol also increases HDL cholesterol and lowers LDL cholesterol. Our study also 2) replicates sex differences in associations which suggests pleiotropy does not underlie the associations, 3) provides further evidence that association is not due to pleiotropy by showing null effects in male non-drinkers, and 4) illustrates a way to measure population-level association where alcohol intake is stratified by sex. In conclusion, population-level instrumental variable estimation (utilizing interaction of rs671 in ALDH2 and sex as an instrument) strengthens causal inference regarding the largely adverse influence of alcohol intake on cardiovascular health in an Asian population.

26 March 2015 In Osteoporosis

SUMMARY: The present meta-analysis shows that a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was observed. Light alcohol consumption was inversely significantly associated with hip fracture risk, whereas heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated hip fracture risk.

INTRODUCTION: Previous studies examining the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture have reported conflicting findings. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to assess the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture.

METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE were searched for prospective cohort studies on the relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fractures. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using random-effects models throughout the whole analysis.

RESULTS: Eighteen prospective cohort studies were included with 3,730,424 participants and 26,168 hip fracture cases. Compared with non-drinkers, the pooled RR of hip fractures for alcohol consumption was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.91-1.15), with high heterogeneity between studies (P<0.001, I2=72.6%). A nonlinear relationship between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was identified (P nonlinearity=0.003). Compared with non-drinkers, the pooled RRs of hip fractures were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.83-0.89) for light alcohol consumption (0.01-12.5 g/day), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.85-1.14) for moderate alcohol consumption (12.6-49.9 g/day), and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.41-2.01) for heavy alcohol consumption (>/=50 g/day).

CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of publication bias. In conclusion, a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and the risk of hip fracture was observed in this meta-analysis. Further, light alcohol consumption was inversely significantly associated with hip fracture risk, whereas heavy alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated hip fracture risk.

 

05 March 2015 In General Health

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA).

METHODS: We conducted a case inverted question markcontrol study of Caucasian men and women aged 45 to 86 years of age from Nottingham, UK. Cases had clinically severe symptoms and radiographic knee or hip OA; controls had no symptoms and no radiographic knee or hip OA. Exposure information was sought using interview-based questionnaires and a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess beverage consumption at ages 21 to 50 years. Odds ratios (ORs), adjusted ORs (aORs), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and P values were estimated using logistic regression models.

RESULTS: A total of 1,001 knee OA, 993 hip OA and 933 control participants were included in the study. Increasing beer consumption was associated with an increasing risk of OA (P for trend inverted question mark0.001). Compared to those who did not consume beer, aORs for people who consumed 20 or more servings of beer were 1.93 (95% CI 1.26 to 2.94) and 2.15 (95% CI 1.45 to 3.19) for knee OA and hip OA, respectively. In contrast, increasing levels of wine consumption were associated with decreased likelihood of knee OA (P for trend <0.001). Compared to those who did not consume wine, aOR for knee OA among those who consumed 4 to 6 glasses of wine per week and inverted question mark7 glasses of wine per week was 0.55 (95% CI 0.34 to 0.87) and 0.48 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.80), respectively. No association was identified between non-alcoholic beverages and knee or hip OA.

CONCLUSION: Beer consumption appears to be a risk factor for knee and hip OA whereas consumption of wine has a negative association with knee OA. The mechanism behind these findings is speculative but warrants further study.

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