13 October 2020 In Diabetes
INTRODUCTION: Both fatty liver disease (FLD) and alcohol consumption have been reported to affect incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of FLD and alcohol consumption on incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this historical cohort study involving 9948 men, we investigated the influence of the presence of FLD and the grades of alcohol consumption on incident type 2 diabetes using Cox proportional hazards models. We categorized the participants into the following four groups: none or minimal alcohol consumption, 280 g/week. FLD was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography. RESULTS: During the median 6.0-year follow-up, 568 participants developed type 2 diabetes. Heavy alcohol consumers with FLD showed a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes compared with the other groups. Moderate alcohol consumers without FLD had a significantly higher risk for developing incident type 2 diabetes, compared with none or minimal and light alcohol consumers without FLD. In contrast, there was no apparent difference in the risk for incident type 2 diabetes between none or minimal, light, and moderate alcohol consumers with FLD. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in the risk for incident type 2 diabetes between a moderate and heavy alcohol consumer without FLD and a none or minimal, light, and moderate alcohol consumer with FLD. CONCLUSIONS: To prevent incident type 2 diabetes, we should acknowledge that the impact of alcohol consumption may vary in the presence of FLD.
25 August 2020 In Liver Disease

BACKGROUND: Favorable association between modest alcohol consumption and cardiovascular disease had been reported in general population, however, whether observed benefit extend to men with established fatty liver disease remains unknown.

METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 10,581 consecutive male participants aged 30 years or older undergoing abdominal ultrasonography and carotid artery ultrasonography were screened. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was diagnosed with ultrasonography and exclusion of secondary causes for fat accumulation or other causes of chronic liver disease. Modest alcohol use was defined as consumption of less than 20 g of alcohol per day.

RESULTS: There were total 2280 men diagnosed with fatty liver, and the mean age was 51.8 years old. Among them, 1797 were modest alcohol drinkers. The prevalence of carotid plaques (55.3% vs. 43.4%, p < 0.001) and carotid artery stenosis (11.0% vs. 5.5%, p < 0.001) was higher in non-drinkers than modest drinkers. Modest alcohol consumption had the independent inverse association with carotid plaques [odd ratio (OR): 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-0.92] and carotid artery stenosis (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.43-0.90), adjusted for age, smoking and metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS: Modest alcohol consumption had a favorable association with carotid plaque or CAS in men with NAFLD

05 June 2020 In Liver Disease

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Moderate alcohol intake is associated with reduced prevalence or incidence of fatty liver. However, whether or not the association is independent of dietary patterns remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the cross-sectional association of alcohol intake with fatty liver after accounting for dietary patterns and obesity.

METHODS: We assessed 4579 adults aged 30-79 years who participated in routine clinical examinations in St. Luke's International Hospital, Japan (January to March, 2015). We assessed their habitual diet using diet-history questionnaire, estimated alcohol intake, and derived dietary pattern variables using factor analysis. Fatty liver was ascertained using ultrasonography. Linear and U-shaped associations of alcohol intake with fatty liver were evaluated using Poisson regression, and a post hoc analysis was conducted after detecting potential outliers for alcohol intake and excluding them using sex-specific statistics (median plus 2 x interquartile range).

RESULTS: Fatty liver was ascertained in 1120 participants (24.5%). Whereas no significant association of alcohol intake with fatty liver was observed when potential outliers of alcohol intake were included (p = 0.25), a significant U-shaped association was observed after excluding the outliers with and without adjustment for dietary patterns (p = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively). The lowest prevalence was estimated when alcohol consumption was approximately 7% of energy, with a prevalence ratio of 0.72 (95% confidence interval = 0.59-0.86) compared to non-drinkers. The association became imprecise and attenuated toward the null after further adjustment for body mass index (p = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol intake showed a U-shaped association with fatty liver prevalence. This association was independent of underlying dietary patterns, while it was sensitive to excessive alcohol intake and obesity status, providing clinical implications for the prevention of fatty liver.

05 June 2020 In Diabetes

We aimed to elucidate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on fatty liver. We assessed the consumption of alcohol in 2429 Japanese males (mean age: 54.2 +/- 9 years); they were classified according to average consumption into non-drinkers (ND), light drinkers (LD), moderate drinkers (MD), and heavy drinkers (HD).

The prevalence of fatty liver was the lowest in the MD and highest in the ND group (p < 0.001), while obesity was not significantly different among the groups (p = 0.133). Elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were the lowest in the MD group (p = 0.011) along with resistance to insulin (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)), which was highest in the ND group (p = 0.001).

Chronic consumption of alcohol was independently and inversely associated with fatty liver and insulin resistance after adjusting for obesity, hypertension, fasting hyperglycemia, habit of drinking sweet beverages, physical activity, and age (odds ratios are as follows: ND, 1; LD, 0.682; MD, 0.771; HD, 0.840 and ND, 1; LD, 0.724; MD, 0.701; HD, 0.800, respectively).

We found that regardless of the type of alcoholic beverage, chronic consumption of alcohol is inversely associated with insulin resistance and fatty liver in Japanese males. This study had limitations, most notably the lack of investigation into diet and nutrition.

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