21 July 2021 In General Health

BACKGROUND: Previously, we reported on associations between dietary patterns and incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) in the REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke) study. Here, we investigated the associations of dietary patterns and a dietary index with recurrent CHD events and all-cause mortality in REGARDS participants with existing CHD.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We included data from 3562 participants with existing CHD in REGARDS. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine the hazard of first recurrence of CHD events-definite or probable MI or acute CHD death-and all-cause mortality associated with quartiles of empirically derived dietary patterns (convenience, plant-based, sweets, Southern, and alcohol and salads) and the Mediterranean diet score. Over a median 7.1 years (interquartile range, 4.4, 8.9 years) follow-up, there were 581 recurrent CHD events and 1098 deaths. In multivariable-adjusted models, the Mediterranean diet score was inversely associated with the hazard of recurrent CHD events (hazard ratio for highest score versus lowest score, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.98; PTrend=0.036). The Southern dietary pattern was adversely associated with the hazard of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for Q4 versus Q1, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-1.91; PTrend<0.001). The Mediterranean diet score was inversely associated with the hazard of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio for highest score versus lowest score, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.95; PTrend=0.014).

CONCLUSIONS: The Southern dietary pattern was associated with a greater hazard of all-cause mortality in REGARDS participants. Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with both a lower hazard of recurrent CHD events and all-cause mortality.

06 May 2014 In Diabetes

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown a J- or U-shaped relation between alcohol and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim was to examine the association between alcohol intake and diabetes and intermediate CHD risk factors in relation to selected ADH and ALDH gene variants.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cross-sectional study including 6,405 Northern European men and women aged 30-60 years from the general population of Copenhagen, Denmark. Data were collected with self-administered questionnaires, a physical examination, a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test, and various blood tests. J shaped associations were observed between alcohol and diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MS), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and total homocysteine. Positive associations were observed with insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol, and a negative association with insulin release. Only a few of the selected ADH and ALDH gene variants was observed to have an effect. The ADH1c (rs1693482) fast metabolizing CC genotype was associated with an increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)/diabetes compared to the CT and TT genotypes. Significant interactions were observed between alcohol and ADH1b (rs1229984) with respect to LDL and between alcohol and ALDH2 (rs886205) with respect to IGT/diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected ADH and ALDH gene variants had only minor effects, and did not seem to markedly modify the health effects of alcohol drinking. The observed statistical significant associations would not be significant, if corrected for multiple testing.

06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

The role of alcoholic beverages in bladder carcinogenesis is still unclear, with conflicting evidence from different studies. We investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and bladder cancer, and the potential interaction between alcohol consumption and other exposures. In a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County, 1,586 pairs of cases and their matched neighborhood controls were interviewed. Data were analyzed to determine whether bladder cancer risk differs by alcohol consumption, and whether different alcoholic beverages have different effects. The risk of bladder cancer decreased with increasing frequency (p for trend = 0.003) and duration of alcohol consumption (p for trend = 0.017). Subjects who drank more than 4 drinks per day had a 32% lower (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.90) risk of bladder cancer than those who never drank any alcoholic beverage. Beer (p for trend = 0.002) and wine (p for trend = 0.054) consumption were associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer, while hard liquor was not. The reduction in risk was mostly seen among shorter-term smokers who urinated frequently. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. The effect was modified by the type of alcoholic beverage, cigarette smoking and frequency of urination.

 

 

 

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