03 June 2019 In Cardiovascular System

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The interrelationship between alcohol consumption and depression is complex, and the direction of the association is unclear. We investigated whether alcohol consumption influences the risk of depression while accounting for this potential bidirectionality.

METHODS: A total of 10 441 individuals participated in the PART study in 1998-2000, 8622 in 2001-2003, and 5228 in 2010. Participants answered questions on their alcohol consumption, symptoms of depression, childhood adversity, and sociodemographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, and lifestyle factors. A total of 5087 participants provided repeated information on alcohol consumption. We used marginal structural models to analyze the association between alcohol consumption and depression while controlling for previous alcohol consumption and depressive symptoms and other time-varying confounders.

RESULTS: Non-drinkers had a higher depression risk than light drinkers (</=7 drinks/week) (risk ratio: 1.7; 95% confidence interval 1.3-2.1). Consumers of seven-fourteen drinks/week had a depression risk similar to that of light drinkers. Hazardous drinking was associated with a higher risk of depression than non-hazardous alcohol consumption (risk ratio: 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.4-2.4).

CONCLUSION: Light and moderate alcohol consumption and non-hazardous drinking were associated with the lowest risk of subsequent depression after accounting for potential bidirectional effects. Hazardous drinking increased the risk of depression.

06 September 2018 In General Health
The scarce research on the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on mental health among older adults suggests a protective effect against depression. We prospectively examined the association between patterns of moderate alcohol consumption, depression and psychological distress, using information from 5,299 community-dwelling older adults from the ELSA and Seniors-ENRICA cohorts. A Mediterranean drinking pattern (MDP) was defined as moderate alcohol intake (
18 May 2018 In General Health

Objective: The objective of this study is to determine whether the health effects of smoking and moderate alcohol use persist with aging.

Method: Smoking status, alcohol use, and measures of function and health were obtained from 9,704 women aged >/=65 years at baseline and over 10- and 20-year follow-up periods. Adjusted multiple linear and logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models estimated associations.

Results: Current versus never smokers had worse walking speed, self-reported health, difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and depression at 10 years and higher death rates at 10 and 20 years. Moderate versus never drinkers had better grip strength, walking speed, self-reported health, and less difficulty with IADLs and were less likely to live in nursing homes at 10 years and die at 10 and 20 years.

Discussion: Among aging women over 20 years, smoking is associated with worse physical function, including death, while moderate alcohol use is associated with better outcomes.

03 May 2018 In Cardiovascular System
Introduction The benefits of alcohol consumption for cardiovascular and metabolic health may have been overstated due to inappropriate comparisons with abstainers and inadequate control for confounding factors including physical activity and mental health. We examined alcohol consumption and cardio-metabolic health in a cohort of young Australian adults overcoming these limitations. Methods Cross-sectional data of a cohort of 2200 participants (age range 25-36 years) from the 2004-06 Childhood Determinants of Adult Health were used. Alcohol consumption was assessed from questionnaire and cardio-metabolic risk factors were measured in clinics. Linear and log binomial regression were used to examine total alcohol consumption (categories: none 0 g/day; light >0-10 g/day [reference]; moderate >10-20 g/day; heavy >20-30 g/day; very heavy >30 g/day) against dichotomous metabolic syndrome and its components: waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose. Covariates included socio-demographics, smoking, diet, physical activity, fitness, depression and anxiety. Results Of the 2220 participants (48% males, mean (standard deviation) age 29.5 (2.5) years), most were classified in the 'light drinking' group (54.2%), less were in the 'non-drinking' (13.2%), 'heavy' (5.2%) or 'very heavy' (5.5%) drinking groups. Only moderate drinking was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (prevalence ratio = 0.64, p
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