09 August 2019 In Phenolic compounds

Resveratrol is a natural non-flavonoid polyphenol found in red wine, which has numerous pharmacological properties including anti-stress and antidepressant-like abilities. However, whether the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects of resveratrol are related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) and its subtypes remains unknown. The same holds true for the subsequent cAMP-dependent pathway. The first set of studies investigated whether resveratrol exhibited neuroprotective effects against corticosterone-induced cell lesion as well as its underlying mechanism. We found that 100muM corticosterone induced PDE2A, PDE3B, PDE4A, PDE4D, PDE10 and PDE11 expression in HT-22cells, which results in significant cell lesion. However, treatment with resveratrol increased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These effects seem related to the inhibition of PDE4D, as evidenced by resveratrol dose-dependently decreasing PDE4D expression. In addition, the PKA inhibitor H89 reversed resveratrol's effects on cell viability. Resveratrol prevented corticosterone-induced reduction in cAMP, pVASP(s157), pCREB, and BDNF levels, indicating that cAMP signaling is involved in resveratrol-induced neuroprotective effects. Not to mention, PDE4D knockdown by PDE4D siRNA potentiated the effect of low dose of resveratrol on cAMP, pVASP, pCREB, and BDNF expression, while PDE4D overexpression reversed the effect of high dose of resveratrol on the expression of the above proteins. Finally, the subsequent in vivo data supports the in vitro findings, suggesting that resveratrol-induced antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects are mediated by PDE4D. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that PDE4D-mediated cAMP signaling plays an important role in resveratrol's protective effects on stress-induced depression- and anxiety-like behavior.

03 June 2019 In Cardiovascular System

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The interrelationship between alcohol consumption and depression is complex, and the direction of the association is unclear. We investigated whether alcohol consumption influences the risk of depression while accounting for this potential bidirectionality.

METHODS: A total of 10 441 individuals participated in the PART study in 1998-2000, 8622 in 2001-2003, and 5228 in 2010. Participants answered questions on their alcohol consumption, symptoms of depression, childhood adversity, and sociodemographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, and lifestyle factors. A total of 5087 participants provided repeated information on alcohol consumption. We used marginal structural models to analyze the association between alcohol consumption and depression while controlling for previous alcohol consumption and depressive symptoms and other time-varying confounders.

RESULTS: Non-drinkers had a higher depression risk than light drinkers (</=7 drinks/week) (risk ratio: 1.7; 95% confidence interval 1.3-2.1). Consumers of seven-fourteen drinks/week had a depression risk similar to that of light drinkers. Hazardous drinking was associated with a higher risk of depression than non-hazardous alcohol consumption (risk ratio: 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.4-2.4).

CONCLUSION: Light and moderate alcohol consumption and non-hazardous drinking were associated with the lowest risk of subsequent depression after accounting for potential bidirectional effects. Hazardous drinking increased the risk of depression.

06 September 2018 In General Health
The scarce research on the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on mental health among older adults suggests a protective effect against depression. We prospectively examined the association between patterns of moderate alcohol consumption, depression and psychological distress, using information from 5,299 community-dwelling older adults from the ELSA and Seniors-ENRICA cohorts. A Mediterranean drinking pattern (MDP) was defined as moderate alcohol intake (
18 May 2018 In General Health

Objective: The objective of this study is to determine whether the health effects of smoking and moderate alcohol use persist with aging.

Method: Smoking status, alcohol use, and measures of function and health were obtained from 9,704 women aged >/=65 years at baseline and over 10- and 20-year follow-up periods. Adjusted multiple linear and logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models estimated associations.

Results: Current versus never smokers had worse walking speed, self-reported health, difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and depression at 10 years and higher death rates at 10 and 20 years. Moderate versus never drinkers had better grip strength, walking speed, self-reported health, and less difficulty with IADLs and were less likely to live in nursing homes at 10 years and die at 10 and 20 years.

Discussion: Among aging women over 20 years, smoking is associated with worse physical function, including death, while moderate alcohol use is associated with better outcomes.

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