23 November 2022 In Dementia

BACKGROUND: Previous studies on associations of alcohol use with memory decline showed inconclusive results. We examined these associations using longitudinal data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS) and explored whether these associations varied by sex and age group.

METHODS: Memory function was assessed by delayed 10-word recall test (DWRT) and immediate 10-word recall test (IWRT) at both baseline (2003-2008) and follow-up (2008-2012) examinations, expressed as the mean annual change and mean annual rate of change in scores. Memory cognitive impairment was defined by DWRT scores of less than 4. Multivariable linear regression models and restricted cubic spline were used for data analysis.

RESULTS: Of 14,827 participants without memory cognitive impairment at baseline, 90.2% were never or occasional drinkers, 5% moderate drinkers, 1.5% excessive drinkers, and 3.3% former drinkers. The mean (standard deviation) age was 60.6 (6.6) years old. During an average of 4.1 years follow-up, 1000 (6.7%) participants developed memory cognitive impairment. After adjusting for confounders, compared with never or occasional drinkers, moderate and excessive drinkers had significant decline in DWRT scores (beta, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.04 (-0.08 to -0.01), and - 0.07 (-0.14 to 0.01), respectively), and IWRT scores (beta, 95% CI = -0.10 (-0.19 to -0.01), and - 0.15 (-0.30 to 0.01), respectively) annually. With respect to the mean annual rate of change, moderate and excessive drinkers also showed greater decline in DWRT scores (beta, 95% CI = -1.02% (-1.87% to -0.16%), and - 1.64% (-3.14% to -0.14%), respectively). The associations did not vary by sex and age group (all P values for interaction >/= 0.10).

CONCLUSION: Compared to never or occasional alcohol use, moderate and excessive alcohol users had greater memory decline and the associations did not vary by sex and age group.

27 October 2022 In General Health

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between caffeine and alcohol consumption and in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The protocol was registered in the PROSPERO database on May 23, 2021 (registration number: CRD42021256649), and updated on August 4, 2022. Two researchers performed a literature search in the PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE databases for articles published before July 15, 2022 independently. Studies investigating the association between caffeine and alcohol consumption and IVF/ICSI outcomes were included, and studies reporting the consumption amount were analyzed using a one-stage robust error meta-regression-based method to explore potential dose-response relationships. Funnel plot was used to assess publication bias if more than 10 studies were included.

RESULTS: Twelve studies on caffeine consumption and 14 studies on alcohol consumption were included in the systematic review, of which seven and nine were eligible for the meta-analysis. These studies included 26 922 women and/or their spouses who underwent IVF/ICSI treatment. Women's and men's caffeine consumption was not significantly associated with the pregnancy rate (odds ratio [OR] 0.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.12; OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.75-1.14; respectively) and the live birth rate (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.89-1.08; OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.86-1.12; respectively) of IVF/ICSI. Maternal alcohol consumption was negatively associated with pregnancy after IVF/ICSI treatment (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-1.01). Paternal alcohol consumption was negatively associated with partner's live birth after IVF/ICSI treatment (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.99). Compared with abstainers, the chance of achieving a pregnancy after IVF/ICSI treatment decreased by 7% for women who consumed 84 g alcohol per week (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.90-0.98), and the chance of partners achieving a live birth decreased by 9% for men who consumed 84 g alcohol per week (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.88-0.94).

CONCLUSIONS: There was no association between caffeine consumption and pregnancy or live birth rate of IVF/ICSI. Women's alcohol consumption was associated with decreased pregnancy rate after IVF/ICSI treatment when weekly consumption was greater than 84 g. Men's alcohol consumption was associated with decreased live birth rate after IVF/ICSI treatment when weekly consumption was greater than 84 g.

27 October 2022 In Dementia

BACKGROUND: Evidence for late-life alcohol consumption being associated with reduced dementia risk is largely based on cohort studies of predominately non-Hispanic white older adults. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between late-life alcohol consumption and dementia risk among Mexican-America adults aged 75 and older.

METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of waves 5 (2004/05) to 8 (2012/13) of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly. The final sample included 1,255 participants. Late-life alcohol consumption status was classified as life-long abstainer, former drinker, and current drinker. Dementia was defined as a score of 18 points or lower on the Mini-Mental Status Examination or a proxy-reported diagnosis of dementia. Results: 41.8% of participants were life-long abstainers, 42.0% were former drinkers, and 16.3% were current drinkers. Current alcohol consumers had significantly lower dementia risk compared to life-long abstainers (HR=0.63, 95% CI = 0.44-0.89). Dementia risk for former alcohol consumers compared to life-long abstainers was not statistically significant (HR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.67-1.09).

CONCLUSIONS: Current alcohol consumption was associated with lower dementia risk for Mexican Americans aged 75 and older. Continued research is needed to identify pathways for the protective association between late life alcohol consumption and dementia risk.

27 October 2022 In Cardiovascular System

Background: The treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) has made significant progress, but the prevention of AF has not received the attention it deserves. A few recent large-sized studies have conducted dose response analysis and reported different conclusions from previous studies on alcohol consumption and AF risk.

Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the potential non-linear association between alcohol consumption and risk of AF and explore the potential differences of gender. Methods: In this updated dose-response meta-analysis, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched until June 2022. Risk estimates were reported as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The random-effects restricted cubic spline models are used to evaluate the potential non-linear association between alcohol consumption and AF risk.

Results: A total of 10,151,366 participants with 214,365 cases of AF enrolled in 13 prospective studies. The overall meta-analysis showed that a 1 drink/day increase in alcohol consumption increased the risk of AF by 6% (RR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.08). In gender subgroup analysis, pooled results were different between men (RR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11) and women (RR: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.96-1.14). A linear relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of AF was found in men (p = 0.87) while a J-shaped curve was observed in women (p = 0.00). Regional subgroup analysis yielded broadly comparable results in Americas (RR: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.03-1.12), Europe (RR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.99-1.1) and Asia (RR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.99-1.14).

Conclusion: The relationship between AF risk and alcohol consumption is linear in men, while a potential non-linear J-shaped relationship is shown in women. Condensed abstract: We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis on the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation. We merged the data of over 10 million participants and found gender differences in the pattern of association with AF and alcohol consumption. The relationship between AF risk and alcohol consumption is linear in men, while a potential non-linear J-shaped relationship is shown in women. In summary, this research is vital in furthering our understanding of the role of alcohol consumption in new-onset AF, especially among different genders.

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