24 October 2019 In Diabetes

BACKGROUND/AIM: Although alcohol consumption is known to affect the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM), reports on the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on DM incidence have been inconsistent. This community-based prospective cohort study was performed to investigate the incidence of DM in male Korean moderate alcohol drinkers.

METHODS: The Ansan and Ansung cohort was used for the analysis. The study population included a total of 3,492 men with no history of DM. The subjects were classified as mild (1-14 g/d), moderate (15-29 g/d), and heavy (>/=30 g/d) drinkers based on their amount of alcohol consumption. The incidence rates of DM in the three groups were compared and analyzed over a 10 year follow-up period.

RESULTS: The hazard ratios (HRs) for DM incidence were 25.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.73-28.90) per 1,000 person years (PY) in mild drinkers, 31.13 (26.11-36.83) per 1,000 PY in moderate drinkers, and 31.68 (26.81-37.18) per 1,000 PY in heavy drinkers (p for trend, p = 0.043). Multivariate regression analysis showed that the HRs (95% CI) for DM were 1.25 (0.97-1.61, p = 0.086) in moderate drinkers and 1.30 (1.01-1.68, p = 0.045) in heavy drinkers compared to mild drinkers. The changes in pancreatic insulin secretion were more remarkable than those in insulin resistance in all three groups.

CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of DM in male Korean moderate drinkers did not increase significantly over the observation period. However, the incidence of DM tended to increase with increasing alcohol consumption. Pancreatic insulin secretion may play a more important role than insulin resistance in the relationship between alcohol and incidence of DM.

24 October 2019 In Cardiovascular System

Wine is a popular alcoholic beverage that has been consumed for hundreds of years. Benefits from moderate alcohol consumption have been widely supported by the scientific literature and, in this line, red wine intake has been related to a lesser risk for coronary heart disease (CHD).

Experimental studies and meta-analyses have mainly attributed this outcome to the presence in red wine of a great variety of polyphenolic compounds such as resveratrol, catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, and anthocyanin. Resveratrol is considered the most effective wine compound with respect to the prevention of CHD because of its antioxidant properties.

The mechanisms responsible for its putative cardioprotective effects would include changes in lipid profiles, reduction of insulin resistance, and decrease in oxidative stress  of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

The aim of this review is to summarize the accumulated evidence correlating moderate red wine consumption with prevention of CHD by focusing on the different mechanisms underlying this relationship. Furthermore, the chemistry of wine as well as chemical factors that influence the composition of the bioactive components of red wine are also discussed.

27 September 2019 In General Health

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To examine outstanding issues in the relationship of alcohol to hypertension. These include whether the increase in BP with alcohol is causally related, the nature of the relationship in women, the contribution of alcohol-related increases in BP to cardiovascular disease and the aetiology of alcohol-related hypertension.

RECENT FINDINGS: Intervention studies and Mendelian randomisation analyses confirm the alcohol-BP relationship is causal. The concept that low-level alcohol intake reduces BP in women is increasingly unsustainable. Alcohol-related hypertension is in the causal pathway between alcohol use and increased risk for several cardiovascular outcomes. The aetiology of alcohol-related hypertension is multifactorial with recent data highlighting the effects of alcohol on the vasoconstrictor 20-HETE and oxidative stress. The high prevalence of both alcohol use and hypertension mandates a careful alcohol history in every patient with elevated BP. Early intervention for excessive alcohol use offers the promise of lower levels of BP and reduced risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

27 September 2019 In General Health

Alcohol consumption is a significant public health issue worldwide. The rat model and epidemiological studies have both reported conflicting results about the effects of alcohol on the kidneys. We aimed to explore the relationships between alcohol consumption and chronic kidney disease. Data from the National Health Interview Survey, the National Health Insurance research database, and the National Deaths Dataset were used. Standardized in-person interviews were executed in 2001, 2005, and 2009 to obtain the demographic characteristics of study population. The participants were followed up until 2013. The primary outcome was new-onset chronic kidney disease. We analyzed 45,200 adults older than 18 years (50.8% men and 49.2% women), and the overall mean (SD) age was 42.73 (16.64) years. During the 8.5 (3.5) years of follow-up, new-onset chronic kidney disease was recognized in 1535 (5.5%), 292 (2.7%), and 317 (4.9%) non-drinking, social-drinking, and regular-drinking participants, respectively. The participants who were social and regular drinkers had a significantly decreased risk of chronic kidney disease incidence (social drinking: adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74-0.97; p = 0.018; regular-drinking: AHR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.98; p = 0.024), with baseline demographics and comorbidities adjusted. In conclusion, social and regular drinkers had decreased risk of chronic kidney disease when compared with non-drinkers.

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