22 September 2022 In General Health

The association between alcohol intake and the risk of glioma has been widely studied, but these results have yielded conflicting findings. Therefore, we conducted this systematic review and updated meta-analysis to systematically evaluate the association between alcohol intake and the risk of glioma. A systematic literature search of relevant articles published in PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI and Wan fang databases up to December 2021 was conducted. Pooled estimated of relative risk (RR) and 95 % CI were calculated using fixed-effects models. A total of eight articles with three case-control studies involving 2706 glioma cases and 2 189 927 participants were included in this meta-analysis. A reduced risk of glioma was shown for the low-moderate alcohol drinking v. non-drinking (RR = 0.87; 95 % CI (0.78, 0.97); P = 0.014). In addition, there was no evidence of an increased risk of glioma in the heavy alcohol drinking compared with non-drinking (RR = 0.89; 95 % CI (0.67, 1.18); P = 0.404). The findings suggest an inverse association between low-moderate alcohol drinking and the risk of glioma, in the absence, however, of a dose-response relationship. More prospective studies are needed to provide further insight into the association between alcohol drinking and glioma risk.

22 March 2022 In General Health

We aimed to investigate whether alcohol intake contributes to lung function levels and which beverage type may have an effect. We investigated 3742 participants from the Wuhai-Zhuhai Cohort and 12,526 participants from the Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort, and they were followed up for 3 and 5 years, respectively.

Information on the type and daily amount of alcohol intake was collected through face-to-face interviews. Lung function was measured by trained physicians using electronic spirometers. Compared with nondrinkers, moderate alcohol intake was significantly associated with a 70.03 and 74.92 mL increase in FEV1 and FVC, respectively (P < 0.05), after adjusting for covariates.

With regard to beverage type, red wine was associated with a 105.31 and 98.91 mL increase in FEV1 and FVC, respectively (P < 0.05). Moderate alcohol intake was also associated with a 53.37 and 66.17 mL increase in FEV1 and FVC for liquor, respectively, and a 106.90 and 103.62 mL increase for red wine (all Ps < 0.05). In the longitudinal analyses, moderate alcohol intake and red wine were associated with a 67.77 and 103.77 mL increase in FVC, respectively (P < 0.05).

Moderate alcohol intake is associated with increased lung function, especially for red wine. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential mechanism.

17 November 2021 In General Health

BACKGROUND: Myopia is a highly prevalent disorder, and one of the first causes of blindness. In turn, alcohol consumption has been shown to be a risk factor for many diseases and a main contributor to the global burden of disease. However, no studies have investigated the relationship between alcohol intake and myopia. Our aim was to prospectively assess the association between alcohol intake and the development or progression of myopia.

METHODS: In a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort (the SUN Project) we assessed 15,642 university graduates, recruited between 1999 and 2018 and followed up biennially through mailed questionnaires. Alcohol intake was assessed with a validated 136-item food frequency questionnaire. Development or progression of myopia was collected in subsequent questionnaires during follow-up every two years.

RESULTS: Alcohol intake was linearly and significantly associated with a higher risk of myopia development or progression: the OR for 10-year incidence/progression of myopia was 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09 per each 10-grams increase in alcohol intake.

CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption might lead to the development or progression of myopia, although confirmation is needed for the mechanisms through which this association may occur, thus further research is needed to verify these findings.

23 February 2021 In Cancer

Alcohol consumption is correlated positively with risk for breast cancer in observational studies, but observational studies are subject to reverse causation and confounding. The association with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unclear.

We performed both observational Cox regression and two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses using data from various European cohort studies (observational) and publicly available cancer consortia (MR). These estimates were compared to World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) findings.

In our observational analyses, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for a one standard drink/day increase was 1.06 (95% confidence interval [CI]; 1.04, 1.08) for breast cancer and 1.00 (0.92, 1.08) for EOC, both of which were consistent with previous WCRF findings. MR ORs per genetically predicted one standard drink/day increase estimated via 34 SNPs using MR-PRESSO were 1.00 (0.93, 1.08) for breast cancer and 0.95 (0.85, 1.06) for EOC. Stratification by EOC subtype or estrogen receptor status in breast cancers made no meaningful difference to the results. For breast cancer, the CIs for the genetically derived estimates include the point-estimate from observational studies so are not inconsistent with a small increase in risk.

Our data provide additional evidence that alcohol intake is unlikely to have anything other than a very small effect on risk of EOC.

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