09 August 2019 In Liver Disease

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Non-alcoholic and alcohol-related fatty liver disease are overlapping diseases in which metabolic syndrome and alcohol consumption each contribute to progressive liver disease. We aimed to assess the effects of alcohol consumption and metabolic syndrome on mortality in individuals with fatty liver. METHODS: We searched the National Health and Nutrition and Examination Survey III for adults (20-74 years old) with hepatic steatosis, detected by ultrasound, for whom mortality and follow-up data were available. We collected data from the alcohol use questionnaire (self-reported number of days a participant drank alcohol; the number of drinks [10 g alcohol] per day on a drinking day; the number of days the participant had 5 or more drinks) and calculated the average amount of alcohol consumption in drinks/day for each participant during the year preceding enrollment. Excessive alcohol consumption for men was >3 drinks/day and for women was >1.5 drinks/day. We also collected clinical data, and mortality data were obtained from the National Death Index. Demographic and clinical parameters were compared among consumption groups using the chi(2) test for independence or survey regression models. We used Cox proportional hazard models to identify independent predictors of all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

RESULTS: The study cohort included 4264 individuals with hepatic steatosis (mean age, 45.9 years; 51% male; 76% white; 46% with metabolic syndrome; 6.2% with excessive alcohol use). There was no significant difference in mean age between individuals with vs without excessive alcohol consumption (P=.65). However, overall mortality was significantly higher among participants with excessive alcohol consumption (32.2%) vs participants with non-excessive alcohol use (22.2%) after mean 20 years of follow up (P=.003), as well as after 5 years of follow up. In multivariate analysis, the presence of metabolic syndrome (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.43; 95% CI, 1.12-1.83) and excessive alcohol consumption (aHR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.21-2.66) were independently associated with an increased risk of death in individuals with hepatic steatosis; any lower average amount of alcohol consumption was not associated with mortality (all P>.60). In a subgroup analysis, the association of excessive alcohol use with mortality was significant in individuals with metabolic syndrome (aHR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.40-4.32) but not without it (P=.74). CONCLUSION: In review of data from the National Health and Nutrition and Examination Survey III, we associated alcohol consumption with increased mortality in participants with fatty liver and metabolic syndrome. These findings indicate an overlap between non-alcoholic and alcohol-related fatty liver disease.

26 February 2019 In Drinking & Eating Patterns

Reduction of excessive alcohol consumption still remains a significant challenge to the actions in the scope of public health of European citizens. The aim of this study is to present the prevalence of alcohol consumption and to estimate the occurrence of risky drinking among college students from the Polish, Slovak, Romanian, and Ukrainian parts of the Carpathian Euroregion, taking social contexts into account. The consumption of alcohol was estimated on the basis of the respondents' statements regarding the quantity and frequency of their consumption of beer, wine, and vodka. The study included people from the first year of undergraduate studies. The analysis used the Chi-square independence test and odds ratios (ORs). There were significant differences in the frequency of alcohol consumption, as well as the individual types consumed, among the respondents from the analyzed countries. Of the examined college students, 70% admit to occasional drinking. The pattern of dangerous alcohol consumption occurs in the case of approximately every seventh person. Risky drinking occurs with much greater frequency among male students rather than their female counterparts. In Romania, a very small percentage of female students engage in risky drinking. The analysis did not show statistically significant differences in the frequency of risky drinking between countries. The coexistence of other adverse health behaviors, such as smoking and alcohol abuse, was confirmed.

 

Reference/Source 

Zadarko-Domaradzka,M.; Barabasz,Z.; Sobolewski,M.; Niziol-Babiarz,E.; Penar-Zadarko,B.; Szybisty,A.; Zadarko,E.

Alcohol Consumption and Risky Drinking Patterns among College Students from Selected Countries of the Carpathian Euroregion

Biomed.Res.Int. 2018

29 October 2018 In Cardiovascular System

Background: To assess sex-specific associations between risk-based alcohol drinking levels and the 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk scores and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors.

Methods: Data from 9,995 Koreans (4,249 men, 5,746 women), aged 40 to 79 years who did not have CVD and participated in the 2011 to 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, were used to assess risk-based alcohol drinking levels in the past year (no drinking, drinking at low risk, and drinking at risk) categorized by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, components of the 10-year CVD risk scores using the Adult Treatment Panel III risk score and the 10-year hard atherosclerotic CVD risk score, CV risk factors, and confounding factors (age, smoking status, body mass index, educational attainment, income level, and physical activity).

Results: Drinking levels had positive associations with blood pressure and levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and inverse associations with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-HDL-C and ratio of total cholesterol (TC) to HDL-C in men, while higher drinking levels were associated with higher HDL-C levels and lower ratio of TC to HDL-C in women after adjusting for confounding factors (p for trend < 0.001). With respect to the 10-year CVD risk scores, higher drinking levels were associated with lower scores in both sexes (p for trend < 0.001).

Conclusions: Risk-based drinking levels were more likely to have dose-dependent associations with CV risk factors in men than in women and had inverse relationships with 10-year CVD risk in both men and women.

27 July 2018 In General Health

A routine of light or moderate alcohol consumption (4drinks/day) is associated with an increased risk for death and cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Excessive alcohol intake trails behind only smoking and obesity among the 3 leading causes of premature deaths in the United States (US). Heavy alcohol use is a common cause of reversible hypertension (HTN), nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation (AF), and stroke (both ischemic and hemorrhagic). Among males aged 15 to 59years, alcohol abuse is perhaps the leading cause of premature death. As such, the risk-to-benefit ratio of drinking is less favorable in younger individuals. A daily habit of light to moderate drinking is ideal for those who choose to consume alcohol regularly. Red wine in particular before or during the evening meal is linked with the best long-term CV outcomes. Most of the studies on alcohol and health are observational, and correlation does not prove causation. Health care professionals should not advise nondrinkers to begin drinking because of the paucity of randomized outcome data coupled with the potential for alcohol abuse even among seemingly low risk individuals.

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