Social and Cultural Aspects

In Europe and the world, the consumption patterns of alcoholic beverages as well as the expectations about the effects of alcohol are strongly influenced by cultural factors. The vast majority of people who drink wine, do so in moderation. This is the reason why reducing the overall amount of alcohol a society consumes does not necessarily reduce the drinking problems in this society. Thus, it is important to consider cultural and social factors when developing alcohol policies.

 

The above summary provides a short overview of the topic, for more details and specific questions, please refer to the articles in the database.

AIMS: To investigate which motives young adolescents indicate for first-time alcohol consumption and whether these motives are linked to risky drinking. METHODS: Logistic regressions were used based on a nationally representative sample of 1,654 11- to 14-year-olds who had consumed alcohol at least once. RESULTS: 'To toast' (42.5%), 'to find out what effect it would have' (36.4%), and 'to have more fun at a party' (31.0%) were most frequently indicated as motives. Boys indicated curiosity about the effect more often than girls who instead more frequently indicated coping motives. Those who had their first drink 'to have more fun at a party' or 'because it was exciting' had a higher likelihood of risky drinking. Moreover, those who indicated depression as…
This study examined associations between perceived peer and adolescent alcohol use in European and North American countries. Self-reported monthly alcohol use and adolescents' report of their peers' alcohol use were assessed in nationally representative samples of students aged 11.5 and 13.5 years ( = 11,277) in Greece, Scotland, Switzerland, and the United States who participated in the 2005/2006 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children survey. Cross-national associations between perceived peer and adolescent alcohol use were examined using logistic regressions and interactions by gender and country. Perceived peer and adolescent alcohol use were positively associated in all countries, but the association was notably weaker in Greece than in Scotland (boys), and in Greece compared to Switzerland (girls). Further examination of the underlying…
OBJECTIVE: To measure alcohol-related harms to the health of young people presenting to emergency departments (EDs) of Gold Coast public hospitals before and after the increase in the federal government "alcopops" tax in 2008. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Interrupted time series analysis over 5 years (28 April 2005 to 27 April 2010) of 15-29-year-olds presenting to EDs with alcohol-related harms compared with presentations of selected control groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of 15-29-year-olds presenting to EDs with alcohol-related harms compared with (i) 30-49-year-olds with alcohol-related harms, (ii)15-29-year-olds with asthma or appendicitis, and (iii) 15-29-year-olds with any non-alcohol and non-injury related ED presentation. RESULTS: Over a third of 15-29-year-olds presented to ED with alcohol-related conditions, as opposed to around a quarter…
Problematic alcohol consumption is a major public health, health education and health promotion issue in Australia and internationally. In an effort to better understand young people's drinking patterns and motivations we investigated the cultural drivers of drinking in 14-24 year-old Australians. We interviewed 60 young people in the state of Victoria aged 20-24 about their drinking biographies. At the time of interviewing, the draft guidelines on low-risk drinking were released by the National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia, and we asked our participants what they knew about them and if they thought they would affect their drinking patterns. Their responses indicate that pleasure and sociability are central to young people's drinking cultures which is supported by a range of…
We posit that: (i) light alcohol consumption during pregnancy does not improve the cognitive development of human offspring and (ii) observational study outcomes indicating apparent protective effects arise from residual confounding due to socioeconomic status. Our hypotheses counter emerging hypotheses apparent in the epidemiological literature that light alcohol consumption during pregnancy improves offspring's cognitive development. Determining the plausibility of this proposition is important given its potential to influence women's alcohol consumption behavior during pregnancy. However, given ethical concerns, it is unlikely that a randomized control trial will be conducted to test this hypothesis. The veracity of alcohol's purported positive effect on cognitive development is therefore explored here by comparing research evidence on light alcohol consumption to the evidence for folate…
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