Social and Cultural Aspects

In Europe and the world, the consumption patterns of alcoholic beverages as well as the expectations about the effects of alcohol are strongly influenced by cultural factors. The vast majority of people who drink wine, do so in moderation. This is the reason why reducing the overall amount of alcohol a society consumes does not necessarily reduce the drinking problems in this society. Thus, it is important to consider cultural and social factors when developing alcohol policies.

 

The above summary provides a short overview of the topic, for more details and specific questions, please refer to the articles in the database.

OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to determine whether three minimum legal drinking age 21 (MLDA-21) laws-dram shop liability, responsible beverage service (RBS) training, and state control of alcohol sales-have had an impact on underage drinking and driving fatal crashes using annual state-level data, and compared states with strong laws to those with weak laws to examine their effect on beer consumption and fatal crash ratios. METHODS: Using the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, we calculated the ratio of drinking to nondrinking drivers under age 21 involved in fatal crashes as our key outcome measure. We used structural equation modeling to evaluate the three MLDA-21 laws. We controlled for covariates known to impact fatal crashes including: 17 additional MLDA-21 laws; administrative…
BACKGROUND: To estimate the incidence of hazardous drinking in middle-aged people during an economic recession and ascertain whether individual job loss and contextual changes in unemployment influence the incidence rate in that period. METHODS: Longitudinal study based on two waves of the SHARE project (Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe). Individuals aged 50-64 years from 11 European countries, who were not hazardous drinkers at baseline (n = 7,615), were selected for this study. We estimated the cumulative incidence of hazardous drinking (>/=40g and >/=20g of pure alcohol on average in men and women, respectively) between 2006 and 2012. Furthermore, in the statistical analysis, multilevel Poisson regression models with robust variance were fitted and obtained Risk Ratios (RR) and…
OBJECTIVE: Disagreement exists over whether permissive minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) laws affected underage adolescents (e.g., those age 17 years with the MLDA of 18). We used MLDA changes during the 1970s and 1980s as a natural experiment to investigate how underage exposure to permissive MLDA affected high school dropout. METHOD: MLDA exposure was added to two data sets: (a) the 5% public use microdata samples of the 1990 and 2000 censuses (n = 3,671,075), and (b) a combined data set based on the 1991-1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiological Survey (NLAES) and the 2001-2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC; n = 16,331). We used logistic regression to model different thresholds of MLDA on high school dropout.…
AIM: To systematically review, using a qualitative, narrative synthesis approach, articles examining alcohol industry efforts to influence alcohol marketing policy, and compare with those used by the tobacco industry. METHODS: Literature searches were conducted between April and July 2011, and updated in March 2013. Articles were included if they: made reference to alcohol industry efforts to influence a) policy debates concerning marketing regulations or b) new specific marketing policies or c) broad alcohol policy which included marketing regulations; were written in English; and concerned the period 1990-2013. Alcohol industry political activity was categorised into strategies/tactics and frames/arguments. Data extraction was undertaken by the lead author and 100% of the articles were fully second reviewed. Seventeen articles met the review criteria.…
To demand 'evidence-based medicine' and 'evidence-based research' has become almost a dogma for researchers and policy-makers in Western cultures. A critical analysis shows that the original intention of the term 'evidence-based' was to aim to use the best existing evidence (emphasising that research should be planned and interpreted in a methodologically correct way), while recognising that, in some areas, experimental research would be neither sensible nor feasible. However, as the paradigm has become established, three dubious and commonly coexisting additional connotations have become prominent in practice: 'proven beyond doubt', 'exclusively relying on experimental research' and 'any conclusions based on empirical data'. Drawing on examples from renowned publications that demand an 'evidence-based alcohol policy', this article argues that much of what…
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