Pregnant Women

The consumption of alcoholic beverages in pregnant women can cause malformations of the embryo and their offspring may exhibit symptoms of foetal alcohol effects, or a collection of foetal alcohol effects called foetal alcohol syndrome; this relationship has been established for heavy alcohol consumption. A no-effect level to prevent harming the unborn child, however,  has not been established. This is the reason why alcoholic beverages should be avoided during pregnancy.

 

The above summary provides an overview of the topic, for more details and specific questions, please refer to the articles in the database.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of low to moderate maternal alcohol consumption and binge drinking in early pregnancy on behaviour in children at the age of 5 years. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Neuropsychological testing in four Danish cities, 2003-2008. POPULATION: A total of 1628 women and their children sampled from the Danish National Birth Cohort. METHODS: Participants were sampled based on maternal alcohol drinking patterns during early pregnancy. When the children were 5 years of age the parent and teacher versions of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were completed by the mothers and a preschool teacher, respectively. The full statistical model included the following potential confounding factors: maternal binge drinking or low to moderate alcohol consumption, respectively; parental…
OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether maternal negative affectivity, a tendency to frequent negative emotions and views, is associated with light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy. DESIGN: Cohort. SETTING: Norway 1999-2008. POPULATION: The study includes complete information on 66 111 pregnant women and their partners. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study (MoBa) representing 39% of the pregnant population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Light alcohol use (0.5-2 units one to four times per month) and binge drinking (an intake of 5 alcohol units or more) measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C). RESULTS: For each unit increase in maternal negative affectivity the odds for light alcohol use increased with 27% in the first trimester…
BACKGROUND: The safety of small amounts of alcohol drinking and occasional binge-level drinking during pregnancy remains unsettled. We examined the association of maternal average alcohol intake and binge drinking (>or=5 drinks per sitting) with infant mortality, both in the neonatal and postneonatal period. METHODS: Participants were 79,216 mothers who were enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort in 1996-2002, gave birth to a live-born singleton, and provided information while they were pregnant on alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Information on infant mortality and causes of death was obtained from national registries and medical records. RESULTS: During the first year of life, 279 children (0.35%) died, 204 during the neonatal period. Infant mortality was not associated with alcohol drinking, even at a…
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the frequency and timing of binge drinking episodes (intake of five or more drinks on one occasion) during the first 16 weeks of pregnancy increase the risk of fetal death. METHODS: The study is based upon data from 89,201 women who were enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1996 to 2002 and participated in an interview that took place in midpregnancy (n=86,752) or after a fetal loss (n=2,449). In total, 3,714 pregnancies resulted in fetal death. Data were analyzed by means of Cox regression models. RESULTS: Neither the frequency nor the timing of binge episodes was related to the risk of early (at or before 12 completed weeks) or late (13-21 completed weeks) spontaneous…
Aims and Method: Alcohol warning labels are one way of influencing alcohol consumption in pregnancy and thereby preventing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). This scoping review describes the literature on the influence of alcohol warning labels (AWLs) for changing attitudes and behavior related to alcohol use in pregnancy; draws on the larger literature related to effectiveness of AWLs which may have relevance to FASD prevention; and situates AWLs within a continuum of strategies to prevent FASD. Findings: Our review of the published literature suggests that while AWLs are popular with the public, their effectiveness for changing drinking behavior is limited. Available research suggests that for maximum effect, AWLs should speak clearly about the consequences of alcohol consumption and should also…
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