Cross-sectional relationship between alcohol consumption and prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Japanese men and women

AIM: The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between alcohol intake and metabolic syndrome in Japanese men and women.

METHODS: Japanese female subjects (n=11,187) were divided into non-, light ( or = 22 ethanol/day) drinkers, and Japanese male subjects (n=19,398) were divided into non-, light ( or = 22 and or = 44 g ethanol/day) drinkers. The mean level of each variable and the prevalence of each risk factor and metabolic syndrome were compared among the groups.

RESULTS: In men and women, blood pressure and HDL cholesterol tended to be higher, and hemoglobin A1c tended to be lower with increased alcohol intake. Waist circumference showed U- and V-shaped relationships, and log-converted triglyceride showed J- and V-shaped relationships with alcohol intake in men and women, respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lowest in light drinkers in men and women and was significantly higher in very heavy drinkers than in non-drinkers in men. In men, the odds ratio vs. non-drinkers for metabolic syndrome was significantly low in light drinkers, while the odds ratio was significantly high in very heavy drinkers. In women, a significantly low odds ratio vs. non-drinkers for metabolic syndrome was obtained in light drinkers.

CONCLUSION: Light drinking is associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome in Japanese men and women, while very heavy drinking is thought to increase the risk of metabolic syndrome in Japanese men.

Additional Info

  • Authors:

    Wakabayashi,I.

  • Issue: J.Atheroscler.Thromb. / pages 695-704 / volume 17
  • Published Date: 2010/7/30
  • More Information:

    For more information about this abstract, please contact
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at the Deutsche Weinakademie GmbH

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